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Entrance

Responsorial psalm (see also music overview for Holy Week and Easter) 

Gospel acclamation (see CWBII 43–53)

John 13:34

Alleluia, Alleluia!
I give you a new commandment:
love one another as I have loved you. 
Alleluia!

Procession of the gifts/offertory 

Communion

Thanksgiving hymn/song/canticle (optional, sung by all)

Sending forth 

First reading

Ecclesiastes 1:2, 2:21–23
Vanity of vanities; all is vanity.

Responsorial psalm

Psalm 89(90):3–6, 12–14, 17
R. In every age, O Lord, you have been our refuge.

Second reading

Colossians 3:1–5, 9–11
You must look for the things that are in heaven, where Christ is.

Gospel acclamation

Matthew 5:3
Happy the poor in spirit; the kingdom of heaven is theirs!

Gospel

Luke 12:13–21
Fool! This very night your soul will be demanded of you.

Images from the Word

Liturgical notes

For in the readings, as expounded by the Homily, God speaks to his people, opening up to them the mystery of redemption and salvation, and offering them spiritual nourishment; and Christ himself is present in the midst of the faithful through his word.

General Instruction of the Roman Missal, §55 

Our daily life is filled with a plethora of words and sounds. We are constantly bombarded with conflicting values and invitations. So, when we come to Sunday Mass, we need to be focussed on our beloved God speaking gently to us. Our readers have already prayed with this Word of God. Drawing upon this prayer, they proclaim the consoling and confronting Word of God. We need to be attentive so that our hearts are willing to live what we hear. 

‘Graciously sanctify these gifts, O Lord, we pray, and, accepting the oblation of this spiritual sacrifice, make of us an eternal offering to you.’ 

—prayer over the offerings

Presider

We are Jesus’ disciples if we have love for one another, a love that embraces the entire world. We open our hearts in prayer for those most in need of God’s healing, justice and peace.

Reader

We pray for Pope Francis and all Church leaders. May they be full of love and compassion as they minister in your name.

Lord, hear us.
Lord, hear our prayer.

We pray for our leaders, and especially for those seeking election to serve our nation. May the Holy Spirit inspire them to pursue a better politics that is wise and courageous and governs for the good of all.

Lord, hear us.
Lord, hear our prayer.

We pray for our country. As we celebrate this week the feast of Our Lady Help of Christians, the Patron Saint of Australia, may we all commit ourselves to this Great Southern Land of the Holy Spirit.

Lord, hear us.
Lord, hear our prayer.

We pray for our faith community. May we never forget those less fortunate than ourselves.

Lord, hear us.
Lord, hear our prayer.

We pray for …

Lord hear us.
Lord, hear our prayer.

We pray for the sick of our parish and for those who care for them.
We pray for those who have died recently and those whose anniversaries occur at this time. May their faith be rewarded now in the fullness of Christ’s new creation.

Lord, hear us.
Lord, hear our prayer.

Presider

God of Mercy, receive these petitions today. Bring your love to bear on all that is unloving and broken in our world. We make this prayer through Christ our Lord.
Amen.

First reading

Acts 14:21–27
They assembled the church and gave an account of all that God had done with them.

Responsorial psalm

Psalm 144(145):8–13a
R. I will praise your name for ever, my king and my God.

Second reading

Apocalypse 21:1–5
He will wipe away all the tears from their eyes.

Gospel acclamation

John 13:34
I give you a new commandment: Love one another as I have loved you.

Gospel

John 13:31–35
I give you a new commandment: love one another.

Images from the Word

Liturgical notes

In proclaiming the Year of the Eucharist in 2004, St John Paul II wrote:

We cannot delude ourselves: by our mutual love and, in particular, by our concern for those in need we will be recognised as true followers of Christ. This will be the criterion by which the authenticity of our Eucharistic celebrations is judged.

Mane Nobiscum Domine, §28

Again our readings today invite us to make this examination of conscience. How do we live this criterion given us by St John Paul? Our Easter season recalls for us the glory that has been given us in baptism: to be the children of God. As we have been loved by our God, so we too must love one another.

‘O sing a new song to the Lord, for he has worked wonders; in the sight of the nations he has shown his deliverance, alleluia.’

—entrance antiphon

Gospel

Jerusalem Bible © 1966 by Darton, Longman & Todd Ltd and Doubleday & Company Inc.

When Judas had gone Jesus said:

‘Now has the Son of Man been glorified,
and in him God has been glorified.
If God has been glorified in him,
God will in turn glorify him in himself,
and will glorify him very soon.

‘My little children,
I shall not be with you much longer.
You will look for me,
and, as I told the Jews,
where I am going,
you cannot come.
I give you a new commandment:
love one another;
just as I have loved you,
you also must love one another.
By this love you have for one another,
everyone will know that you are my disciples.’

(John 13:31–35) 

Did you know? 

Points of interest and Catholic lore 

Exploring the Word 

The Gospel of John is often divided into two sections: the Book of Signs, detailing the public ministry of Jesus aimed at bringing people to belief, and the Book of Glory, which outlines the events leading to his death and resurrection. One part of that concluding section of the gospel describes the events of his final night with his followers. It is too late now for those who have not recognised that Jesus is the Messiah. He closets himself with those who do believe and gives them extended instruction on how they are to continue his mission after he is gone. Both today’s reading and next week’s gospel come from this section of the text. 

Jesus is telling his disciples not just that they must love each other, but also that they must love as he has loved. This moves beyond the commandment known to the Jews to love one’s neighbour as oneself. The love that Jesus showed was the total self-giving and selfless love that led to his death on the cross—his glorification. It is this love that reveals the love of God, who islove. This new and difficult love is to be the true mark of a Christian in a truly Christian community.

Making connections 

Opportunities for group discussion and personal prayer 

Sharing the tradition 

A closer look at the Scripture of the day, to see how it makes more explicit God’s word to us through the teachings of Jesus Christ 

‘Ever since St Augustine, the Ten Commandments have occupied a predominant place in the catehesis of baptismal candidates and the faithful’ (CCC §2065). The Ten Commandments outline how to live in right relationship both with God (the first three) and with our neighbour (the remaining seven). They cover all aspects of living in fidelity to the love of God for God’s people.
‘Ever since St Augustine, the Ten Commandments have occupied a predominant place in the catehesis of baptismal candidates and the faithful’ (CCC §2065). The Ten Commandments outline how to live in right relationship both with God (the first three) and with our neighbour (the remaining seven). They cover all aspects of living in fidelity to the love of God for God’s people.

The new commandment of Jesus to love one another as he loved takes this a step further.

Symbols and images 

The new commandment of love for one another becomes the defining principle and sign of discipleship. It is through this love for each other, which sets believers apart from the rest of the community, that people will know that they are followers of Jesus. This is much more difficult than it sounds! The biggest challenge is to act with love towards those we find it difficult to like!

Living the Word 

Practical ideas for group leaders to employ in connecting Scripture and daily life, with suggestions for music and environment 

Entrance

Responsorial psalm (see also music overview for Ordinary Time) 

Gospel acclamation

Matthew 5:3

Alleluia, Alleluia!
Happy the poor in spirit;
the kingdom of heaven is theirs!
Alleluia!

Procession of the gifts/offertory 

Communion

Thanksgiving hymn/song/canticle (optional, sung by all)

Sending forth 

Gospel

Jerusalem Bible © 1966 by Darton, Longman & Todd Ltd and Doubleday & Company Inc.

Jesus said:

‘The sheep that belong to me listen to my voice;
I know them and they follow me.
I give them eternal life;
they will never be lost
and no one will ever steal them from me.
The Father who gave them to me is greater than anyone,
and no one can steal from the Father.
The Father and I are one.’

(John 10:27–30) 

Did you know? 

Points of interest and Catholic lore 

Exploring the Word 

This text in John’s Gospel is set in Jerusalem, while Jesus is there for the Feast of Dedication (John 10:22), a feast celebrating the presence of God in the temple. The temple was not just a building for Israel. It was the visible place where God dwelt in the heart of God’s people; to go to the temple and worship was to ‘approach God’. Jesus is teaching something completely new here. He stands within the temple precinct and declares that it is only through him and through hearing his voice that people can come to the Father. The voice of Jesus is both seen and heard in the events of his life, death and resurrection. It is through all these events that the ways of God are made known to us.

Making connections 

Opportunities for group discussion and personal prayer 

Sharing the tradition 

A closer look at the Scripture of the day, to see how it makes more explicit God’s word to us through the teachings of Jesus Christ 

Symbols and images 

The care that a shepherd showed for his flock remains a powerful image in the Church, despite its origins in an ancient agricultural society. In our country, with its vast paddocks and endless fences, the work of a true shepherd has lost some of its meaning, but the intimacy and tenderness of the image still speak to us of the closeness of Christ’s relationship with all who believe in him.

Living the Word 

Practical ideas for group leaders to employ in connecting Scripture and daily life, with suggestions for music and environment 

First reading

Genesis 18:20–32
Abraham negotiates with the Lord.

Responsorial psalm

Psalm 137(138):1–3, 6–8
R. Lord, on the day I called for help, you answered me.

Second reading

Colossians 2:12–14
Christ has brought you to life with him and forgiven us all our sins.

Gospel acclamation

Romans 8:15bc
You have received the Spirit which makes us God’s children, and in that Spirit we call God our Father.

Gospel

Luke 11:1–13
How to pray

Images from the Word

Liturgical notes

In the Lord’s Prayer a petition is made for daily food, which for Christians means preeminently the Eucharistic Bread, and also for purification from sin, so that what is holy may, in fact, be given to those who are holy.

General Instruction of the Roman Missal, §81 

The inclusion of the Lord’s Prayer in the Mass came very early. Including this prayer at the time of Communion draws us in two ways. First, we, the holy people of God, petition the Holy One to give us a share in that holiness: ‘Give us today our daily bread.’ This petition then links the Eucharist with our petition for forgiveness: ‘Forgive us as we forgive.’ The generous gift of God is an invitation to do the same and forgive those who ‘have trespassed against us’. So we move from this prayer to the sign of peace. 

‘Accept, O Lord, we pray, the offerings which we bring from the abundance of your gifts, that through the powerful working of your grace these most sacred mysteries may sanctify our present way of life and lead us to eternal gladness.’ 

—prayer over the offerings

First reading

Acts 13:14, 43–52
We are now turning to the Gentiles.

Responsorial psalm

Psalm 99(100):1–3, 5
R. We are his people, the sheep of his flock.

Second reading

Apocalypse 7:9, 14–17
The Lamb who is at the throne will be their shepherd and will lead them to springs of living water.

Gospel acclamation

John 10:14
I am the good shepherd, says the Lord; I know my sheep, and mine know me

Gospel

John 10:27–30
I give my sheep eternal life.

Images from the Word

Liturgical notes

On Sundays, especially in Easter Time, the blessing and sprinkling of water as a memorial of Baptism may take place from time to time in all churches and chapels, even in Masses anticipated on Saturday evenings. If this rite is celebrated during Mass, it takes the place of the usual Penitential Act at the beginning of Mass.

Roman Missal, p. 1358

Because of the close connection between the season of Easter and the celebration of Christian initiation, it is helpful to include the blessing of water in place of the penitential act. By this inclusion, we are reminded that through our washing in water and consecration by anointing in confirmation, we are sharers in Christ—Priest, Prophet and King. As the priestly people of God, we gather for Mass to exercise this priesthood in sacrifice and thanksgiving.

‘The merciful love of the Lord fills the earth; by the word of the Lord the heavens were made, alleluia.’

—entrance antiphon

Entrance

Responsorial psalm (see also music overview for Holy Week and Easter) 

Gospel acclamation (see CWBII 54–61)

John 10:14

Alleluia, Alleluia!
I am the good shepherd, says the Lord;
I know my sheep, and mine know me. 
Alleluia!

Procession of the gifts/offertory 

Communion

Thanksgiving hymn/song/canticle (optional, sung by all)

Sending forth 

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